CLARE K. ROTHSCHILD
Welcome to the academic website of Professor Clare K. Rothschild, Associate Professor of Theology at Lewis University.
RECENT PUBLICATIONS
Galen's De Indolentia

GALEN'S DE INDOLENTIA
Essays on a Newly Discovered Letter

edited by Clare K. Rothschild and Trevor W. Thompson

In 2005 a French doctoral student discovered the long-lost treatise, De indolentia (Περὶ ἀλυπησίας/ἀλυπίας) or On the Avoidance of Distress in a monastic library in Thessalonica. This volume includes a brand new English translation of the text, a collation of all discrepancies among the leading critical editions of the Greek text, and essays by eminent Classicists and scholars in the field of early Christianity on different aspects of this fascinating new text. More information is available at the Mohr-Siebeck website.

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The Rise and Expansion of Christianity THE RISE AND EXPANSION OF CHRISTIANITY IN THE FIRST THREE CENTURIES OF THE COMMON ERA
edited by Clare K. Rothschild and Jens Schröter

A new book edited by Clare and Jens Schröter is available from Mohr-Siebeck. The essays collected here are, in part, from a July 2010 symposium at Humboldt University in Berlin. The aim of the conference was to shed light on the origin and rapid spread of Christianity in the first three centuries. Supplemental essays have been added. More information is available at the Mohr-Siebeck website.

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Christian Body, Christian Self CHRISTIAN BODY, CHRISTIAN SELF
edited by Clare K. Rothschild and Trevor W. Thompson

Early Christian texts are replete with the language of body and self. Clearly, such concepts were important to their authors and audiences. Yet usage rarely makes sense across texts. Despite attempts to establish a single biblical or Christian vision of either body or self across texts, the evidence demonstrates plurality of opinion; and, reception history multiplies interpretations. Depending upon the particular anthropological-philosophical paradigm of the interpreter (e.g., Platonic, Cartesian), Christian texts reflect a number of views about the body and self. Today, scholarship on these concepts advances in many different directions. In addition to sophisticated new methods of drawing history-of-religions comparisons, scholars place early Christian texts in conversation with philosophy, psychology, political science, and developments in the hard sciences — in particular the neurosciences, sometimes all but doing away with the notion of self. Recent studies and monographs focus on the disabled body, the gendered body, the slave body, the martyr’s body, relevance of ancient scientific and medical treatises for understanding the body, the asexual body/self, embodied knowledge, the suffering self, and religion and the self.

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